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Event ID : AO
Academy of Osseointegration
2011 Conference Archive
Washington DC
March 3-5, 2011


AO 26th Annual Meeting

Highlights of the Academy of Osseointegration's 2011 Annual Meeting are also available on a USB flash drive. 
Click Here to Order

AVAILABLE FORMATS:
Audio (MP3 Format): Individual MP3 files require a computer or MP3 player.
Video (MP4 Format): MP4 files are synchronized video files that combine all recorded audio with presentation slides. MP4s are playable on a computer or MP4 compatible device.

ULTIMATE PACKAGE PRICE : $100.00


Table of Contents
Corporate Forum Sessions
Opening Symposium: Controversies in Implant Dentistry
International Symposium
Limited Attendance Lectures
Point / Counterpoint: Controversies and Debates in Implant Therapy - Treatment of the Esthetic Zone
Surgical Track
Restorative Track
Closing Symposium: Major Catastrophies and How to Avoid or Handle Them
Dental Assistant, Dental Hygienist and Office Coordinator Program


March 3rd, 2011
Corporate Forum Sessions
Target Audience : Annual Meeting attendees

Objectives :

This collection of sessions offers a unique and significant opportunity to view the latest research and developments in the field of craniofacial implant technology.



______________________

The Progression of Implant Dentistry
BIOMET 3i Corporate Forum

Speaker(s) :

  • The introduction of tissue engineering has complemented our classical regenerative treatment regimens. Periodontal regeneration and localized osteogenic procedures to enhance bone volume can assist with implant osseointegration. These procedures include sinus lift, horizontal and vertical ridge augmentation and compromised extraction sites.



March 3rd, 2011
Opening Symposium: Controversies in Implant Dentistry
______________________

What is the Future of Implant Dentistry?

Speaker(s) :

  • From the initial observation that bone could closely adapt to alloplastic implants resulting in a process now known as “osseointegration,” there developed an appreciation that this process could be beneficial towards support and retention of dental prostheses. Years of scientific documentation have identified a high degree of predictability using this technique. Incredible cosmetic results are often cited as the examples of potential for this technique, however, esthetic considerations alone ignore the broadspectrum of deficits experienced by patients suffering from edentulism.

  • Missing teeth lead to a myriad of concerns beyond those related to cosmesis. Traditional methods of treatment may lack the predictability associated with implant supported prostheses. Consequently the future of this treatment approach may rest more in the re-establishment of a comfortable and functional support mechanism that is not highly susceptible to biologic deterioration rather than efforts that appear to be directed towards only one aspect of prosthetic concerns. This presentation provides a broad view of the management of patient complaints in the areas of comfort, function and esthetics through the use of dental implants and also provides a rationale for greater adoption of this technology.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the current utilization of dental implants in the management of edentulism and partial edentulism; 2) explore future avenues for market development; and 3) discuss research initiatives in implant and regenerative procedures.

______________________

Challenges for the Future in Implant Dentistry: Hard and Soft Tissue Regeneration - Report from the 2010 Summit

Speaker(s) :

  • The report from the AO’s 2010 Summit will include a synopsis of the presentations by the experts on the topics of: bioengineering, stem cells, soluble growth factors, nanotechnology, and outcomes assessment. These synopses will be supplemented by the conclusions of the breakout sessions and plenary sessions. Based on this Summit, current new therapies are available for clinical use, with other therapies realistic in the near future. The discussion will focus on clinically relevant topics with a view toward the future for patient benefit.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the use of current and future nanotechnologies; 2) identify the current use of autologous and allogeneic stem cells and the limitations of this technology with a glimpse into future directions; 3) discuss the status of single growth factor administration and multi-factor constructs; and 4) identify the need for directed outcome assessment to determine the significance of technology.

______________________

Using Digital Dentistry for Implant Planning

Speaker(s) :

  • General technical developments, especially in the area of computers, have led to new and fascinating tools becoming available for medicine and dentistry. Contemporary methods within radiology, such as computerized tomography and medical imaging, have made patient information available for diagnosis in a totally new way. Furthermore, ongoing developments have made these technologies less costly and therefore more readily available for doctors and patients. Guided surgery is an example of a technology that has developed in this way. The utilization of new powerful technologies has to be conducted in close consultation with experienced clinicians. The technology is just a tool, no matter how powerful. These new concepts and protocols are presented in a manner that allows clinicians to provide their patients with practical and predictable immediate function.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) identify the benefits of digital dentistry; 2) discuss the rationale for a computerized pre-surgical planning; and 3) avoid surgical complications.

______________________

Digital Dentistry: Do We Really Need It?

Speaker(s) :

  • As we have moved into the digital age, a number of “digital tools” have been introduced into the armamentarium of implant dentistry. While fashionable to some, practitioners continue to obtain excellent results using tried and true “low tech”methods. This presentation will review these methodologies and demonstrate that optimal results can be obtained without the use of “high tech” digital tools. It will also elucidate some of the pitfalls with CBCT scans, templates, and CT derived surgical guides.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss clinical examination techniques of bone mapping and physical palpation of tissue; 2) identify the importance of a diagnostic wax-up; and 3) describe the fabrication and use of plane film radiographic template and surgical templates. 4) understand current limitations of CBCT scans, templates, and CT derived implant guides.

______________________

Challenges for the Future of Implant Dentistry: Technology Transfer - Report from the 2010 Summit

Speaker(s) :

  • Healthcare providers are regularly confronted with advertisements promoting new oral health technologies. Dentists have a professional, ethical and legal responsibility to inform their patients about any new technologies that have been shown to be safe and effective. In order to stay current and competitive, they must also adopt and implement some of these technologies in their clinics. But how do dentists know which new technologies are truly safe and effective and how do they decide which to integrate into their daily practices? Furthermore, while some dental practitioners are willing to take additional clinical training to develop competence in the provision of a new innovative technology, some tend to be overwhelmed by the attributes of the new technology and shy away from its use. Using implant technology as an example, Professor Feine will describe the process of technology assessment and transfer, as well as how dentists can make better informed decisions about whether or not to inform their patients about or to adopt a new technology. She will also report on barriers to and incentives for the adoption of new oral health technologies.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the path from development to implementation of a new health technology; 2) list the information sources on which an oral health clinician can rely when considering whether or not to recommend or to adopt a new oral health technology; and 3) describe the barriers and incentives that dentists and patients may experience in the adoption of implant technology.

______________________

Long Term (5-year) Results: Immediate vs. Delayed Placement and Loading of Dental Implants in the Esthetic Zone

Speaker(s) :

  • This lecture is designed to introduce treatment teams to the concepts of early and immediate surgical and restorative procedures in the esthetic zone. The biologic foundation and current evidence supporting accelerated protocols will be considered. Multidisciplinary assessment and pre-treatment risk analysis from a functional and esthetic perspective will be considered for accelerated procedures. Surgical considerations will include minimally traumatic options, the concept of horizontal defect dimension, implant morphology and surface and contemporary grafting alternatives. Restorative considerations will include diagnostic procedures and treatment preparation, templates, provisional and definitive restorative alternatives.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe indications and contraindications for accelerated treatment protocols; 2) discuss multidisciplinary patient and site assessment and appropriate implant selection; 3) identify minimally traumatic extractions and modified surgical procedures; 4) discuss provisionals and restorations as they relate to accelerated protocols; and 5) identify the biologic, esthetic and functional advantages of accelerated treatment protocols.

______________________

Long-Term Implant Success (5 years): Early Placement in the Esthetic Zone

Speaker(s) :

  • Various clinical approaches for the replacement of extracted teeth with implant-supported restorations have emerged in recent years. This presentation will focus on long-term data of anterior implants, specifically addressing esthetic parameters. Based on these results, the rationale for an early placement/early loading concept will be discussed in detail, comprising the related preoperative analysis, decision making process and clinical/laboratory stepby- step procedures. In particular, the fundamental difference between single tooth sites, two adjacent missing anterior maxillary teeth, and more extended edentulous segments, often accompanied by significant horizontal and vertical tissue deficiencies, will be addressed. Finally, a critical appraisal of the recent evolution in implant design and novel restorative components, such as CAD/CAM derived high-strength ceramic elements will be made.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) identify the principle risk factors associated with anterior maxillary implant therapy; 2) provide a detailed description of the early implant placement concept, including simultaneous contour augmentation procedures; and 3) describe the critical appraisal of the respective currently available long-term data.



March 4th, 2011
International Symposium
______________________

Management of the Deficient Maxilla

Speaker(s) :

  • The phenomenon of osseointegration described by Prof. Brånemark in the early 50’s and its application in implant dentistry has represented the most important breakthrough in the rehabilitation of the edentulous patient. Following tooth extraction, the maxilla undergoes bone resorption in specific patterns. The atrophic maxilla presents one of the most challenging treatments because of its specific anatomy and the repercussion to normal function, esthetics and facial expression; which will in turn influence the patient’s psychological behavior. Implant therapy objectives are to provide anchorage for a prosthesis to re-establish adequate function and dental and facial esthetics. Different factors should be analyzed for the correct diagnosis and treatment planning. Bone resorption patterns, smile line, lip support and phonetics will play an important role in determining the design of the final restoration. This presentation will focus on the diagnosis of different types of maxillary bone resorption patterns, the effects in facial parameters and the different surgical approaches for each type of situation. The different degrees of resorption are classified as moderate, severe or totally atrophic. Surgical approaches include guided bone regeneration, autogenous block grafting and utilization of anatomical buttresses (pterigoid, zygomatic). Evidence-based long term results of the different treatment alternatives will be presented.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) identify and classify different degrees of maxillary bone resorption; 2) describe treatment modalities depending on type and degree of bone resorption; and 3) project treatment outcomes.

______________________

Evidence Based Protocols for Anterior Esthetics

Speaker(s) :

  • Installing an implant in the anterior region of the mouth places no more challenges concerning osseointegration, now a well-defined and safe clinical issue. Nevertheless, predictability of perfect esthetics remains controversial, especially in situations that require side by side implants and immediate extraction sites in the anterior maxilla. The control of the hard and soft tissues perfect plastic shape depends highly on delicate surgical procedures, correct choice of implant design and materials, surface biological enhancement and a careful prosthetic sequence of steps. The clinician needs a safe and precise protocol that she or he might follow in order to provide patients with trustable esthetic solutions. Well conducted and high level studies must be analyzed in order to extract from scientific facts the correct clinical procedures. This presentation will address the most recent study conclusions together with the best clinical variations that might lead to beautiful accessible results, with special concern to long endurance, since implants are now widely used in very young patients.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the correct moment and adequate circumstances to place an implant in extraction sockets; 2) discuss the limitations and restrictions of different biotypes and periodontal disease susceptibility in the prognosis of contiguous implants; and 3) identify different biological characteristics related to implant design stages of bone regeneration.

______________________

Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Alveolar Bone Augmentation

Speaker(s) :

  • Tissue engineering is one of the most important targets in the field of medicine in the 21st Century. According to the concept, all of the dental tissue can be regenerated by using stem cell, scaffold and growth factors. In my lecture, a new approach for alveolar bone regeneration using bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell is presented because it is thought to be the most important and clinically available technique for implant surgery. We have also developed the skin rejuvenation therapy in peri oral region by using gingival fibroblast injection system which is combined with implant treatment. In all, over 150 cases have been treated by tissue engineering technology and showed good clinical results in our clinic. The tissue engineering therapy in implant treatment can provide the patient the higher esthetic result and satisfaction.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the tissue engineering concept; 2) apply the concept in implant surgery; and 3) discuss the future possibility of tissue engineering.

______________________

Accuracy of Computer Guided Implant Placement using a Mucosa Supported Surgical Template

Speaker(s) :

  • Computer-assisted, template-guided implant placement in general includes a workflow of the following steps: a) pre-surgical fabrication of radiographic guide to provide prosthetic information; b) 3-D scanning to enable visualization of bony anatomy, vital structures and pre-fabricated denture; c) virtual implant planning in a computer software based on the information of bone structure and prosthesis, and d) production of surgical template (i.e. CAD/CAM stereolithographic technique and implant placement precisely guided by the template). Implant information recorded in the surgical template makes prefabrication of provisional prosthesis possible for immediate loading. It is regarded as a future trend because of less invasiveness, flapless surgery if mucosa supported template is utilized, predictable implant position in correlation to prosthesis, avoidance of possible bone grafting and destruction of vital structure, etc. On the other hand, accuracy of this technique has raised a great awareness about deviation of transferring the virtual planning to real implant sites. This deviation as a whole is supposed to result from every step of process, predominantly from production of surgical template and the guided surgical procedure of implant placement. This presentation will mainly evaluate influential factors of accuracy in the surgical phase and illustrate their effects on the deviation of implant positions compared to the planned implants with the template having a focus on maintenance of good accuracy.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe linear and directional deviations of implant position inherent to computer-guided implant placement; 2) identify the sources of deviation related to the whole process; and 3) discuss how to ensure a good accuracy of implant planning transfer from the standpoint of surgical procedure.

______________________

Future Horizons for Growth Factor Applications in Implant Reconstruction

Speaker(s) :

  • The application of growth factors has been introduced into implant dentistry mostly to enhance peri-implant bone regeneration and facilitate augmentation procedures. Among the many different factors, molecules from the bone morphogenic protein family have proven to have the most reliable osteogenic activity. An unresolved question is the mode of delivery of BMPs in clinical applications. Loading of carrier systems such as collagen or inorganic bovine bone is commonly accomplished by soaking the carrier with the growth factor solution leading to simple adsorption of the growth factor to the carrier surface. Adsorptive coating, however, is associated with a rapid release and hence loss of activity, which in turn requires large overdoses of BMP to achieve clinically predictable results. This has implications with respect to costs and safety issues. Future horizons for growth factor applications would therefore be the application of biotechnology to develop controlled release carriers that can be moulded and at the same time proved adequate mechanical strength and degradability. This presentation reviews different approaches using alternative growth factors and growth factor combinations as well as novel carrier systems.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss how and why application of growth factors is dependent on the carrier and release of factors from the carrier; 2) describe how and why different carrier systems affect release kinetics; and 3) identify how problems with current carrier systems can be solved.

______________________

Esthetic Design in Complex Cases

Speaker(s) :

  • Achieving an esthetic result is one of the most important goals of implant dentistry. The art and clinical science begins with conceptualizing the management of the edentulous space by the restorative and surgical teams. This becomes essential in meeting the needs and expectations of the patient. The restoration of cervical contour of the planed crown will be a key to implant planning, placement and restoration and the existing bone is a determinant in the design of this new restoration. This presentation will show protocols using a step by step format with guidelines to restore complex fully maxillary cases in immediate or delayed placement with immediate or conventional loading and using the Most Apical Buccal Bone Level (MABL) in the esthetic zone as point of reference during the design phase in order to simplify the treatment plan and avoid, in some cases, the necessity of grafts. Design, creation and transfer of new pink and white esthetics are key aspects during the surgery that will determine the final esthetic outcome as performance of bone reductions and 3-D immediate implant placement, and use of different types of abutment in different cases will be presented.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) develop an esthetic design in a complex case using the Most Apical Bucal Bone Level as point of reference; 2) create the new pink and white esthetics in the laboratory; and 3) transfer the new esthetics from the laboratory to the patient.



March 4th, 2011
Limited Attendance Lectures
______________________

LA-2 Review of Bone Grafting Techniques and Indications

Speaker(s) :

  • Reconstruction of the deficient and/or atrophic residual ridge presents unique challenges to the implant surgeon. There are numerous materials that may be utilized for bone augmentation procedures. This presentation will review the spectrum of reconstructive options for repairing localized bone defects to severe deficiency. The lecture will discuss an organized approach to diagnosing and selecting graft techniques for particular clinical situations.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the various bone grafting techniques for managing ridge defects; 2) discuss the indications for specific bone augmentation procedures; and 3) review clinical cases highlighting the use of bone grafting techniques.

______________________

LA-3 Immediate Loading and Immediate Implants: Techniques and Indications

Speaker(s) :

  • For more than a decade, the concept of immediate loading of endosseous implants has become increasingly popular. Dental literature is flooded with articles describing numerous techniques and discussing the concept. This presentation will take a close look at clinical/technical protocols evolving around this modality. Consideration should be given to the fact that applying the concept of immediate loading to the fully edentulous patient either in the maxillary arch or in the mandible should be regarded as a different entity when considering the esthetic outcome as a variable in the anterior esthetic zone.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) determine when immediate loading/ immediate placement is a feasible option; 2) discuss the limitations and potential contraindications of utilizing these clinical protocols; 3) describe the significant role of team communication for these clinical protocols; and 4) determine which techniques will give the most successful and longstanding results.

______________________

LA-5 Implant Provisionalization for Single Tooth and Extended Edentulous Situations: A Step-by-Step Process

Speaker(s) :

  • Evidence-based success has resulted in increasing utilization of dental implants in the treatment of all forms of edentulism. Successful treatment outcomes are directly related to the proper planning, placement and restoration of these implants. This presentation will emphasize one area of the implant rehabilitation process that plays a large role in achieving these predictable outcomes; the utilization of implant supported provisional restorations. Clinical techniques will be presented that will focus on the stepby- step fabrication of provisional restorations that shape the transition zone, which will assist in maximizing esthetic outcomes. Cemented and screw-retained options that can be utilized in long-span situations will also be covered as well as clinical techniques utilized to simplify provisional fabrication.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the importance of the implant transition zone and how provisional restorations can be utilized to shape this area; 2) highlight current clinical procedures utilized to fabricate cemented and screw-retained provisional restorations; and 3) introduce various provisional materials that can be used to fabricate provisional restorations.

______________________

LA-6 Selection of Proper Abutments for Specific Prosthetic Indications

Speaker(s) :

  • Patients today are more informed about dental implants and their expectations are for esthetically and functionally pleasing implant restorations that mimic natural teeth. This course will focus on principles, guidelines and the rationale for selecting appropriate abutments for the single posterior and single anterior implant to achieve optimum esthetic yet functional and practical implant restorations. The presentation promises to be of interest to both the experienced and the novice practitioner. It will result in effortless decision-making as it enables the restorative dentist to collaborate with the surgeon and direct the laboratory technician in the design of each single implant situation. This is an interactive lecture enhanced with the use of digital response devices. Guidelines for developing a decision tree in using screw-retained, cement-retained, custom or patient-specific abutment will be presented. Multiple clinical cases are presented in which audience members will key in their responses.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) analyze clinical conditions for appropriate abutment selection for the single implant; 2) identify how the restorative dentist can better communicate with the surgeon and the laboratory technician; and 3) demonstrate practicediagnosis and treatment planning on multiple clinical cases.

______________________

LA-7 A Retrospective of Implant Experience: From Day 1

Speaker(s) :

  • It is somewhat rare that the time frame of practice from the beginning of osseointegration in North America (June, 1982) can be chronicled through the parallel experience of two clinicians. Drs. Sullivan and Parel were participants in the original Toronto conference, and have since practiced implant dentistry almost exclusively in both academic and private practice settings. Both have observed and taught the discipline of osseointegrated implant dentistry for over 27 years and bring a singular perspective to a retrospective evaluation based on their evolutionary experience. This tandem presentation will look at long term rehabilitation of the partially edentulous patient, especially with regard to esthetics, and advances in edentulous reconstruction over this time period. Long term follow-up data will be utilized to support currently accepted protocols for this range of patient presentations from the unique perspective of two practitioners who have (almost) “seen it all”.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the evolutionary process of implant technology for the partially edentulous patient; 2) discuss the rationale and effectiveness of changes in implant arrangements that affect the edentulous patient; and 3) describe the changes in surgical techniques that have evolved to improve esthetic and functional outcomes for implant patients.

______________________

LA-8 Management of Failed Sinus Grafts and Alveolar Ridge Augmentation

Speaker(s) :

  • Maxillary sinus augmentation for implant reconstruction of the posterior maxilla is a predictable surgical procedure. Although complications are uncommon, some may result in total graft failure with potentially serious consequences. This clinical presentation will focus on the causes, recognition, prevention and management of failed sinus grafts and alveolar ridge augmentation. Emphasis will be on treatment of the failed sinus graft and will include a detailed surgical, CT and medical approach to address this not often discussed topic.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the causes of sinus graft failure; 2) recognize and minimize sinus graft failures; and 3) utilize a proven surgical, CT and medical protocol for management of the failed sinus graft.

______________________

LA-9 Prosthetic Support During Management of Failed Implant Cases

Speaker(s) :

  • Implant dentistry has proven to be a successful and predictable treatment modality used to restore the most simple to the most complex case type. Although complications do occur, the restoration of the existing dental implant patient due to case failure brings many challenges to the surgical/restorative team. Patient management both psychologically and clinically can be difficult at best. Prosthetic management of the transition between the failed case to the new restoration is of the utmost importance. This lecture will address these challenges, along with provisional restoration during case revision, management of the obsolete dental implant system, redesign and revision of existing prosthetics and management of teeth that fail adjacent to existing implant restorations. Strategies to prevent failures will be presented along with recommendations for maintenance.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) recognize the failing dental implant case; 2) identify provisional restorations appropriate for managing the transition from the failed case to the new implant restoration; 3) describe strategies to manage the obsolete dental implant system; and 4) discuss prevention of future failures.

______________________

LA-12 Use of rhBMP-2 for Reconstruction of Alveolar Ridge and Maxillofacial Defects

Speaker(s) :

  • Extensive multi-center controlled research projects have validated that rhBMP-2/ACS 1.5mg/ml is a safe and efficacious alternative to autogenous bone grafts for anterior maxillary extraction sockets when facial wall defects are present, and for deficient posterior maxillary ridges grafted by a sinus lift technique. Histological specimens obtained by trephine core biopsy of grafted sockets and sinus sites have shown de-novo intramembranous bone formation for the first time in the adult human. This research has shown total regeneration of extraction sockets including the facial wall, and sinus lift sites with viable bone. This core science provides a basis for the application of de-novo bone regeneration to a variety of maxillary and mandibular alveolar ridge defects. During this lecture we will introduce the concept of implant specific bone grafting designed to provide efficiency and specificity to grafts placed for the purpose of dental implants. We will discuss grafting in conjunction with implant placement, as well as specific osteotomy techniques and the use of intrinsic and extrinsic matrices in conjunction with BMP to permit development of a graft that is specific to the planned implant.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss rhBMP2 mediated cell and tissue interactions that result in de-novo bone formation; 2) discuss tissue, graft and scaffold requirements for alveolar ridge augmentation; 3) review tissue reactions to rhBMP2 and patient safety considerations; 4) describe the principals of simultaneous rhBMP2 graft placement in conjunction with implants and 5) demonstrate flap development and soft tissue preservation techniques used in conjunction with rhBMP-2 grafts that facilitate implant outcomes.

______________________

LA-13 Immediate Implant Placement: Esthetic and Functional Outcomes

Speaker(s) :

  • Immediate implant placement has been widely adopted in the management of patients for tooth replacements with implants. Over the years, this technique has proven to be a reliable treatment option, with excellent long-term survival rates. However, the esthetic outcomes have not been as reliable, with recent studies identifying a number of risk factors for recession of the periimplant mucosa. In this course, patient and operator-related risk factors for adverse esthetic outcomes with immediate implants will be discussed. Strategies for case selection and appropriate planning of treatment will be presented, with the aim of increasing the reliability of esthetic outcomes with this mode of therapy. Adverse and optimal esthetic outcomes will be demonstrated by way of clinical cases and discussion.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the success rate for esthetic outcomes with immediate implants; 2) discuss the risk factors associated with adverse esthetic outcomes; and 3) describe strategies for appropriate case selection for immediate implants.



March 4th, 2011
Point / Counterpoint: Controversies and Debates in Implant Therapy - Treatment of the Esthetic Zone
______________________

Immediate Implant Provisional Restoration: PRO

Speaker(s) :

  • Implant dentistry is continuously evolving, offering new and more predictable forms of therapy with minimally invasive protocols. Innovative techniques now allow for better esthetics and greater patient comfort. However, these new techniques and therapies continue to raise questions and concerns regarding the risk and rewards of each. Specifically, controversial issues regarding implant survival and esthetic outcomes related to immediate single tooth anterior implant replacement and immediate provisional restoration will be presented. This lecture will address current concepts, research and innovations in immediate implant placement and how they can enhance treatment procedures, time and clinical outcomes for greater patient care and satisfaction.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the treatment time and survival rates associated with immediate protocols; 2) discuss the treatment objectives of provisional prosthetic abutment/crown contours; and 3) determine the impact on hard tissue buccal modeling and peri-implant soft tissue thickness.

______________________

Guidelines for Selecting Implant/Prosthetic Protocols in the Esthetic Zone

Speaker(s) :

  • Modern implant-prosthetic restorations using different implant designs call for a harmonious esthetic integration with the pre-existing environment. Thus, a scalloped gingival line with distinct papillae and free of any abrupt vertical differences in clinical crown length between anterior implants, is paramount. In this context, risk assessment, treatment planning, surgical/loading protocols, biologic considerations affecting normal peri-implant soft tissue integration and esthetic/prosthodontic parameters will be discussed as treatment regulators for long-lasting esthetic outcomes. Clinical considerations will be analyzed in the context of their direct application to esthetic implant-prosthetic rehabilitations and based on the current scientific evidence. Finally, recommended planning steps and treatment procedures will be presented through scientific evidence and illustrated with clinical examples treated at the School of Dental Medicine of the University of Geneva and Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe current trends in esthetic implant dentistry; 2) assess associated risk factors for suitable treatment planning; and 3) widen treatment planning options using a selective approach.

______________________

Use of Analog Technology for Implant Restorations

Speaker(s) :

  • CAD/CAM custom implant abutments and CAD/CAM implant restorations have become more common treatment choices today. While this technology will unquestionably be the way of the future, the clinician should not be too eager to discard tried and true analog techniques. This presentation will discuss the transition phase that we are in and how the combination of both analog and digital technologies may give us the best of both worlds for superior implant restorations.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) compare analog and digital techniques for single abutments; 2) compare analog and digital techniques for implant supported fixed partial dentures; and 3) compare analog and digital techniques for fixed full dentures.

______________________

Use of Digital Technology to Improve Implant Restorations

Speaker(s) :

  • The world of computer-assisted designing and computer-assisted manufacturing, custom implant abutments and implant restorations have changed the world of implant dentistry dramatically. This technology has helped improve the esthetics of implant restorations, clinical procedures, more predictable laboratory procedures and using materials that are biocompatible for patients. This presentation will discuss the use of digital technology and the improvement of implant restorations.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the various types of CAD/CAM implant restorations; 2) identify material choices of CAD/CAM implant restorations; and 3) discuss use of the verified index in CAD/CAM restorations.

______________________

Flapless Surgery Yields More Esthetic Results: Use of Imaging and Planning Software

Speaker(s) :

  • The long-term esthetic outcome with dental implant therapy depends to a large extent on the stability of the peri-implant hard and soft tissues. It is recognized that the trauma associated with the elevation of surgical flaps compromises the vascularity of the mucosa and underlying alveolar bone. This in turn increases the risk of hard tissue resorption and soft tissue recession. Flapless surgery has been advocated as means to minimize this surgical trauma. Recent experimental and clinical research, coupled with advances in imaging, planning and navigational software, has demonstrated that flapless surgery holds advantages over the traditional flap approach in defined clinical indications. In this lecture, the evidence for flapless surgery will be presented, and the clinical indications for this approach will be presented.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the experimental and clinical evidence for flapless surgery; 2) identify the diagnostic factors required to select the appropriate cases for this approach; and 3) describe the use of imaging and planning software for use in conjunction with flapless surgery.

______________________

Is a Flap Required in Most Anterior Implant Cases?

Speaker(s) :

  • This presentation will specify the individual case factors that determine whether a traditional flap versus a minimally invasive approach such as the palatal peninsula flap or pouch and tunnel approaches are indicated for implant placement in the maxillary anterior area versus the indications and requisites for a “flapless” approach. The influence that pre-treatment diagnostic findings such as the patient’s desires and level of esthetic concern, the results of an individualized esthetic risk assessment and the indicated type of prosthesis have on determining which type of soft tissue surgical access will be most beneficial for the patient and implant surgeon will be demonstrated by a series of detailed clinical case presentations.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the individual case factors that determine whether a flap versus a minimally invasive approach versus a “flapless” approach is indicated for implant placement in the maxillary anterior area; 2) discuss the pre-treatment diagnostic findings required to perform“flapless” surgery for placement of an implant or implants in the maxillary anterior area; and 3) discuss the pre-treatment diagnostic findings that require a traditional open flap or minimally invasive approach for placement of an implant or implants in the maxillary anterior area.

______________________

Papilla Augmentation: Prosthetic Enhancement of Soft Tissues

Speaker(s) :

  • Esthetically replacing missing teeth in areas of significant anterior ridge deformities has been and still is a significant challenge in dentistry. High esthetic expectations and the addition of implant therapy have only increased the challenge. This presentation will outline a new prosthetic option besides the existing surgical and orthodontic options to enhance esthetically the soft tissue architecture. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis, design and benefits of the 3D prosthetic reconstruction of deficient ridge and its ability to enhance the esthetic result of the final tooth form (white esthetics) and gingival design (pink esthetics).

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) identify the relation between soft tissue deformities and tooth morphology problems; 2) perform a smile design project that incorporates white and pink esthetics and will guide surgical and restorative procedures; 3) utilize pink ceramics and pink composite to esthetically mimic natural gingival tissue; and 4) adapt surgical procedures, such as 3D implant placement, grafts and soft tissue conditioning to enhance the final result of pink restorations.

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Papilla Enhancement in Implant Dentistry: Surgical Solutions

Speaker(s) :

  • Outside of clinical situations where gross ridge destruction is caused by disease processes or by iatrogenic surgical or restorative procedures, the vast majority of tissue anatomy problems encountered in implant treatment can be handled by the surgical and restorative team members. Comprehensive treatment planning, surgical precision and appropriate use of emerging materials and techniques can set the tone for ideal esthetics from the surgical and prosthetic perspectives. Enhancing bone and soft tissue volume, quality and stability in implant therapy either prior to or in conjunction with implant placement is important to both functional and esthetic success. New bone grafting materials and techniques will be presented and the potential strengths and limitations in vertical ridge enhancement will be reviewed. The impact of implants with a platform switch connection and 3D implant positioning considerations on tissue volume and long-term stability will be discussed. The key step of soft tissue grafting to improve tissue volume and to promote long-term tissue stability will be emphasized.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) illustrate commonly encountered esthetic clinical dilemmas in implant dentistry; 2) recognize that ridge augmentation can be accomplished with allograft blocks as an alternative to autogenous blocks for the management of moderate to severe ridge resorption problems in the esthetic zone; 3) describe material handling and clinical outcomes; 4) identify cases where tissue grafting should be considered; and 5) discuss the rationale for soft tissue grafting based on literature results.



March 5th, 2011
Surgical Track
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What Every Surgeon Must Know About Prosthetic Concepts

Speaker(s) :

  • Treatment outcomes with dental implants and implant-supported prostheses of various kinds have consistently improved since the early days of osseointegration. This steady increase in survival and success rates of implants and prostheses is certainly due to our better understanding of contributing biological, (bio)mechanical and clinical factors, including the recognition that prosthetically driven implant placement is key. Nevertheless, complications and failures in implant therapy continue to occur. A substantial portion of those can be attributed to implant malpositioning, or in other words, implants, which are placed in a position or direction that creates prosthetic problems of design, esthetics, function and cleansibility. This presentation will highlight prosthetic concepts for different indications in partially and fully edentulous patients that should be considered in treatment planning and surgical protocols of implant placement.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) outline prosthesic concepts that will reduce the risk for short – and long-term complications; 2) clarify that implant malpositioning is a major etiological factor for compromised treatment outcomes and complications with implant assisted prostheses; and 3) highlight the critical components for implant placement in esthetic sites.

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What Determines Implant Success?

Speaker(s) :

  • Success – the achievement of an objective or goal, the opposite of failure (Wikipedia). It would seem from the meaning that it is essential to define the objectives and goals of implant treatment to define success. This presentation identifies those clear parameters which are essential to success and its goals; namely primary, secondary and tertiary stability, esthetic outcome, maintenance and time dependent parameters. It also brings into question the concept that “implants live forever.”

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe methods for obtaining implant stability at placement; 2) explain methods for measuring implant stability and interpretation of results; and 3) identify the different factors contributing to implant success.

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Computer Guided Surgery - CT Based Advanced Computer Guided Implant Dentistry

Speaker(s) :

  • In the constantly evolving field of implant dentistry, the dentist plays a critical role in the long-term success of dental implants. Due to the predictability of dental implants in achieving osseointegration, once considered the ultimate goal, it is now the standard of care for tooth replacement. A new paradigm in implant dentistry is being developed. The goal in implant dentistry has now shifted to delivering an esthetic implant-supported restoration in as short a time as possible. Cases will be presented where fixed restorations were placed at the time of implant placement and including at the time of extraction of teeth. Computer driven templates were used and the planning allowed for the patients to leave, the same day, with a fixed immediate loaded prosthesis in a minimally invasive manner without the need for any ridge or sinus augmentation(s). New biologic principles, computer guided treatment planning, surgical procedures and restorative protocols have evolved to achieve this rapid and long-term esthetic result. Attendees will gain a clear understanding of these new implant modalities and how these techniques will be utilized in a team approach to insure a high level of patient comfort, acceptance and beautiful smiles.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) review the benefits of computer based planning to help promote better communication between the surgical specialist, restorative dentist and the laboratory technician; 2) identify case selection and treatment planning required to avoid any problems; 3) discuss how to transform pre-planned treatment into clinical reality; 4) use a flapless approach to maximize patient comfort; and 5) demonstrate the use of computer based treatment planning to help avoid bone grafting – a solution for the partially and/or fully edentulous patient.

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Hard Tissue Augmentation to Enhance Contours and Functional Support for Implants

Speaker(s) :

  • Maxillofacial reconstruction with iliac crest bone grafts and titanium implants in the atrophic maxilla will be presented including the 10 – 15 year follow up results. Bone and soft tissue reformation with the combination of onlay bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis and virtual planning of implant placement in patients with severe post-traumatic defects will be presented. The clinical, as well as experimental, results from a novel surgical technique for rehabilitation of the atrophic posterior maxilla with sinus membrane elevation and simultaneously placement of implants without the use of any graft material will be presented.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) show the long term results after bone reconstruction of the severe atrophic maxillae prior to rehabilitation with implants; 2) describe the use of bone grafting in combination with distraction osteogenesis and endosseous implants for the reconstruction of the severe posttraumatic defects in the anterior maxilla; and 3) describe the augmentation of the atrophic posterior maxilla with the mere lifting of the maxillary sinus membrane and insertion of implants without the use of any grafting material.

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Soft Tissue Augmentation to Improve Esthetics

Speaker(s) :

  • Today’s patients are increasingly demanding when it comes to their smile’s esthetic appearance. In a time where physical beauty surely plays its role, our contribution in preserving or improving our patient’s smile has become significant. The two areas of great esthetic concern to patients are the length of their teeth and the interdental loss of periodontium. Many surgical concepts have proven to be successful in treatment of these defects. But we have to be aware that every surgical procedure has a certain margin of unpredictability during the healing process. Therefore, the aim of this presentation is to present first a microsurgical concept which will allow the surgeon to fulfill the high esthetic demands from the patients in the daily practice on a more predictable base. Second, the issue of the long term stability needs to be discussed. Achieving good esthetic is important, but maintaining it over a long time is even more important for our patients. Can the use of connective tissue graft improve the outcome by providing an increased thickness over time?

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the new microsurgical concept in periodontal reconstructive surgery; 2) describe predictable surgical concepts to overcome demanding esthetic compromised sites; and 3) discuss the effect of reconstructive procedures over a long period of time.

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Growth Factors in Implant Dentistry - How Do We Continue to Improve?

Speaker(s) :

  • Further improvements in bone augmentation procedures can either be related to simplification of the clinical handling or influencing biological processes. Growth factors or bioactive proteins and peptides in combination with adequate carrier systems are nowadays able to stimulate the natural regeneration process, to accelerate bone regeneration and to increase predictability in bone regeneration therapy. Although there are a lot of preclinical studies and a few clinical studies, growth factors are still not in general practice. One reason might be the lack of ideal carrier materials allowed to reduce the costs and the dosage. The use of a newly developed synthetic carrier system together with a biologic active factor has demonstrated similar amounts of newly formed bone in experimental defects as the use of autogenous bone. It can be concluded that biologic tissue stimulation with the use new matrix systems has the potential to overcome some of the present difficulties in GBR procedures.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the problems encountered with the clinical use of growth factors in implant dentistry; 2) identify what indications rhBMP-2 has been approved; and 3) discuss the possible advantages of a new synthetic carrier material for growth factors in implant dentistry.



March 5th, 2011
Restorative Track
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What Every Restorative Dentist Must Know About Surgical Concepts

Speaker(s) :

  • This presentation will focus on the surgical principles that must be understood by the restorative dentist. These concepts will lead to more ideal treatment of patients who want the ultimate esthetic and functional result.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe incision design that can make esthetic result more ideal instead of compromised; 2) discuss the sequence of events between the restorative and surgical phase of treatment; and 3) identify how and when to provisionalize for optimal functional and esthetic result.

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Maxillary Overdentures: Non-Splinted Units

Speaker(s) :

  • Implant overdentures in the mandible have proved successful, efficacious and cost effective. They have evolved to include several abutment designs that have diminished the need and cost for splinting. There is limited data on maxillary overdentures using non-splinted implant units, however patients still desire the benefits of implants in the maxilla while also requesting cost containment. The use of non-splinted implants in the maxilla are a means to maintain peripheral seal when the number of implants are three or less. When a greater number of implants are employed and the distance and spread of implants is increased, the independent units begin to bear more of the load and retention demands. With an increased number of implants, the need for full contact of the palate and posterior peripheral seal may be less necessary.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) consider positions of non-splinted implants in the maxilla; 2) discuss the periphery of the maxillary prosthesis when using non-splinted implants; and 3) consider tiered and cost-effective implant overdenture prostheses designs.

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Short Implants: Indications and Long-term Success

Speaker(s) :

  • Very severe jaws represent a challenge for the surgeon. Advanced surgical therapies were developed in order to place the longest implants possible. However, few practitioners are able to perform bone grafting procedures or bone regenerations in their daily practice. More and more patients take medications which contraindicate advanced surgical procedures. It is why short implants are more and more proposed as a reliable therapeutic option. According to the 2006 EAO Consensus Conference, a short implant is an intra bony device with a length of 8mm or less. However, literature review and theoretical analysis reveals that the success rate of short implants could be compared to the longer implants, while their morbidity remains very low. Moreover, the deplacement of short implants into the bone leads to flexibility which increases the resistance of the implant/abutment/crown complex. During the lecture, it will be suggested that the use of short implants can simplify the surgical procedure and can allow the surgeon to concentrate on the 3D implant placement. In conclusion, it will be suggested that very short implants would represent a very elegant and efficient solution for patients susceptible to periodontal diseases. The notion of long term provisional restoration will also be discussed.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) indicate short implants in their routine practice; 2) describe why short implants prognosis is as good as long implants; and 3) discuss why the treatment morbidity is as important as the implant success or survival rate.

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Soft Tissue Esthetics – Abutment Design and Materials

Speaker(s) :

  • The ultimate goal of soft tissue esthetics of implant treatment is mimicking the color, texture and shape of healthy gingival condition of natural teeth. In order to mimic natural teeth gingival condition, we need to understand how the periodontium react to current implant treatment and prosthetic materials compare to the prosthetic treatment of teeth. The topic of soft tissue esthetics has been discussed so many times in numerous articles. This presentation focuses on the abutment design and material selection for soft tissue esthetics, reviewing past experiences and the current concept, as well as finding the future direction.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss major and minor factors which influence soft tissue esthetic of implant; 2) discuss the importance of abutment design and material for soft tissue esthetics; and 3) review past experiences of different abutment materials with soft tissue reactions.

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The Everyday Ultimate Surgical Guide

Speaker(s) :

  • Currently, the prosthetic technique for providing computer guided treatment and immediate-load prosthesis is technically demanding and time consuming. A complete review of software applications, guides, laboratory techniques and steps used to perform guided surgery and immediate-load prosthesis will be presented. A new simplified prosthetic and surgical protocol than in most previous studies will be discussed including performance data on this treatment.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the accuracy and application of implant treatment planning software; 2) identify various types of immediate load prosthesis and their performance; and 3) identify the computer, laboratory and clinical steps involved in delivering an immediate load prosthesis.

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Digital Impressions and CAD/CAM Restorations

Speaker(s) :

  • Two of the most significant developments that have recently taken place in the field of dental medicine are undoubtedly the spectacular and rapid progress achieved in intraoral scanning technology and directly linked CAD/CAM restorations. One can clearly speak of a major shift of paradigms, as traditional “analogue” restorative treatment procedures which included physical impression taking, plaster cast fabrication, articulator mounting, wax patterns and finally casting and free-hand ceramic layering, are now increasingly being replaced by a more virtual reality. In fact, three-dimensional CAD planning based on the individual patient’s data set can be performed directly and exclusively on the computer screen. Thus the presentation will focus on the impact of this development on daily practice and try to provide a critical appraisal from a clinician’s point of view.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the major progress made in intraoral scanning technology and directly linked CAD/CAM restorations; and 2) present a detailed description of practical procedures as they relate to CAD/CAM of implant borne restorations.



March 5th, 2011
Closing Symposium: Major Catastrophies and How to Avoid or Handle Them
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Discussion of Implant Claims, Damages and Remedies

Speaker(s) :

  • Over the past thirty years, the placement of osseointegrated implants has become an integral part of the practice of dental medicine. The interest and acceptance by the health care consumer has lead to unprecedented demand and dental implants have become a significant adjunct to the modern dental practice. As such, many segments of the dental profession have sought to develop expertise in the treatment planning, surgical placement, and restoration of dento-alveolar implants. Accompanying this phenomenon has been a significant number of failures of procedures and expectations with the concomitant professional liability claims and regulatory complaints. This program will use case-based examples to outline the major areas of claim activity and areas of interest by the plaintiffs’ bar. Additionally, we will review the frequency and severity of various types of damages and suggest standards of practice to decrease exposure.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the most common types of implant claims; 2) discuss the most frequent and severe types of damages; and 3) describe standards of professional practice to limit exposure.

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Bisphosphonate Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ): Prevention and Management

Speaker(s) :

  • Bisphosphonates are a class of agents that are widely used in the management of metastatic disease to the bone and in diseases of altered bone turnover. Despite these benefits, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is an emerging complication that has afflicted a subset of patients receiving these drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis and metastatic bone cancer. This complication usually presents following simple dentoalveolar surgery but it can also occur spontaneously. The risk of developing this complication appears to be related to the potency of the bisphosphonate, the duration of exposure and dentoalveolar trauma. Stage-specific management strategies have been developed as well as guidelines for evaluating the potential risks associated with this new and emerging complication. In view of the widespread use of long-term bisphosphonate therapy, the observation of an associated risk of steonecrosis of the jaw should alert practitioners to monitor for this previously unrecognized complication and to re-evaluate the indications for and the duration of bisphosphonate therapy in patients with osteopenia/osteoporosis and cancer. Implementing prevention strategies and establishing an early diagnosis might prevent or reduce the morbidity associated with BRONJ. This presentation will review the current strategies for prevention and management of BRONJ. Bisphosphonates are a class of agents used to treat osteoporosis and malignant bone metastases.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) review the clinical signs and symptoms of BRONJ; 2) discuss the risk factors and prevention strategies related to BRONJ; and 3) identify treatment strategies for patients who present with BRONJ.

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Major Catastrophies Associated with Full Arch Implant Reconstructions (Including Provisionalization During the Retreatment Phase)

Speaker(s) :

  • The full arch Implant reconstruction can be challenging and complex. There are many variables that affect the longevity and predictability of treatment. Proper diagnosis, treatment planning and meticulous execution of the surgical and prosthetic teams are key for a successful outcome. Utilization of up-to-date dental materials is crucial for long-term maintenance and success of the reconstruction considering the increased longevity of our population. Many difficulties can be overcome with proper planning. It is imperative to communicate these possibilities to the patients and how to prevent and resolve them if they occur. Careful considerations by clinicians with reliable and proven materials and techniques should be carefully considered in this reconstruction with the entire team. Degree of difficulty should be classified from the surgical and prosthetic plan in the diagnostic phase. The experience and success of each member of the team, which includes the surgeon, restorative dentist and dental technician, should also be considered for the execution of straightforward, advanced and complex cases.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) predict failure and eventualities that can occur in full arch reconstruction; 2) evaluate risk factors in full arch implant reconstruction; and 3) prevent failures and be prepared for the possible occurrence.

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Challenging Maxillary Implant Cases: How to Manage Them and Avoid Complications

Speaker(s) :

  • In treating patients with atrophic maxilla, whether in the partially or totally edentulous atrophic maxilla, the final prosthetic plan must determine both the sequencing and techniques used in planning and executing the surgical phase of treatment. In spite of all the advances in computer generated treatment planning, the fundamental approach of determining through traditional prosthetic evaluation, both the patient’s esthetic and functional expectations as to the type of surgical reconstruction required is still the key in planning these cases. While many cases might best be treated with a telescopic type fixed/removable prosthesis supported by a few implants only requiring localized grafting using autogenous, allografts, xenografts or growth factors, this presentation will focus more on those cases where the patient desires a fixed “permanent” reconstruction necessitating a much more inclusive interdisciplinary approach. If we are able to provide the proper bony foundation and alveolar relationship relative to the planned occlusal scheme, with appropriate surgical techniques, the patient can be reconstructed with a prosthesis that mimics replacement of the lost anatomy without mechanically correcting the jaw discrepancy through prosthetic design alone, thus avoiding long term prosthetic failure.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) treatment plan the management of the atrophic maxilla – identifying the correct sequence of therapy; 2) describe hard and soft tissue requirements to avoid failure; and 3) discuss the role of maxillary/mandibular relationships on the final outcome.

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Dealing with Unanticipated Adverse Events: Skills to Move Forward

Speaker(s) :

  • Proper management of an unexpected serious complication can be considered as the most challenging event in implant rehabilitation. Successful resolution of unanticipated adverse events requires ethical patient communication and support, as well as appropriate clinical treatment. Professional liability carriers and malpractice defense attorneys estimate that communication failure is a contributing factor in 80% of professional liability claims and 20% of the filing of the claim. This presentation outlines essential skills in the process of effective patient communication, the “I’m sorry” approach and clinical steps taken on the patient’s behalf to resolve the complication in a satisfactory manner. Specific case reports will be presented to demonstrate the skills to move forward following a serious complication or failure.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) describe the ethical rationale for disclosure of adverse events; 2) implement the “I’m sorry” approach following a complication or treatment failure; and 3) provide two alternative clinical approaches to resolve the consequences of the adverse event or failed treatment results.



March 5th, 2011
Dental Assistant, Dental Hygienist and Office Coordinator Program
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Osseointegration: What We Know Now that We Didnt Know Then! (Part 1)

Speaker(s) :

  • The success of implant dentistry is contingent on both achieving and sustaining ossseointegration. The long term prognosis of implant dentistry is complicated by the changing complexity of the patient. Intraoral and systemic factors can negatively influence long-term outcomes. The development of periodontal/pathogenic flora can be influenced by medications that affect quantity and quality of saliva and crevicular depth. Similarly, the development of diseases can result in changes of the flora and impair the host response and negatively impact bone remodeling. The loss of integrity between any of the restorative components can have a negative effect on the bone. Preventive care is not merely daily plaque control and debridement at the appropriate interval. Awareness of the patient’s systemic state and correlating peri-implant changes with an etiologic basis serves as a means by which a patient-specific preventive strategy can be developed.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) identify systemic factors that can influence osseointegration; 2) list medications that can affect the tissues and flora around implants; and 3) recognize complications that can appear during the preventive phase of treatment.

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Basics of Implant Dentistry Treatment Planning: How Assistants Participation Facilitates the Process

Speaker(s) :

  • The dental assistants and hygienists are the link between the dentists and the patients. Often the patients ask the staff for their opinion. Therefore, it is important for the whole team to understand treatment goals. Implant dentistry offers many treatment options that were not available 20 years ago. Today, we may have one diagnosis but multiple treatment plans. In this session the success rates and complications of different implant treatment options will be discussed, along with the advantages of an implant restoration over conventional dentistry. Single- and multiple-unit implant restorations and implant-supported versus tooth-supported overdentures will be presented. The interim phase often worries patients, as they are afraid that they have to walk around without any teeth. It is important to be able to explain to them every step of the treatment, including the provisional phase.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) discuss the success rates and complications of single and multiple implant restorations; 2) educate patients about different implant treatment options; and 3) explain the different provisionalization methods.

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Dental Implant Practice Marketing - Internal and Online Marketing Secrets

Speaker(s) :

  • This session will discuss important Internet based techniques that effectively promote a dental implant practice (surgical and restorative) on all major search engines via organic, viral and social media marketing. We will also familiarize participants with the ability to pre-educate prospective dental implant patients online prior to the initial visit. We will review how to best use the practice website and facilitate treatment planning and increase case acceptance. Online collaboration with referring colleagues will be demonstrated, along with Internet methodologies that will enhance office productivity.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) appropriately promote a practice website to patients and referring doctors; 2) describe how search engines find and rank dental implant websites; and 3) communicate online (securely) with patients and referring doctors.

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Osseointegration: What We Know Now that We Didnt Know Then! (Part 2)

Speaker(s) :

  • The success of implant dentistry is contingent on both achieving and sustaining ossseointegration. The long term prognosis of implant dentistry is complicated by the changing complexity of the patient. Intra oral and systemic factors can negatively influence long-term outcomes. The development of periodontal/pathogenic flora can be influenced by medications that affect quantity and quality of saliva and crevicular depth. Similarly, the development of diseases can result in changes of the flora and impair the host response and negatively impact bone remodeling. The loss of integrity between any of the restorative components can have a negative effect on the bone. Preventive care is not merely daily plaque control and debridement at the appropriate interval. Awareness of the patient’s systemic state and correlating periimplant changes with an etiologic basis serves as a means by which a patient specific preventive strategy can be developed.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the participant will be able to: 1) recognize iatrogenic factors that can cause periimplant mucosal inflammation; 2) identify restorative designs that can hamper effective plaque control; and 3) describe how different implant systems will affect bone levels around implants.

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The Implant Coordinator: A Vital Component of Your Implant Team

Speaker(s) :

  • Take the pulse of this vital component of your implant team; the implant coordinator. In times when offices are downsizing and referrals drop; a well-trained implant coordinator is invaluable to your team. Revisit the importance or addition of this critical position to a well-balanced implant team. What are the important steps for treatment planning and case presentation in the pre-surgical, post-surgical and restorative phases of implant dentistry. Building relationships are key. The implant coordinator is your link for a successful implant practice to the referring office, laboratory, implant company and most of all…the patient.

  • Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 1) evaluate the value of an implant coordinator, including which team member would qualify, how much time is needed for this position and what are the responsibilities; 2) describe the three areas which the implant coordinator position revolves around, including patient care, marketing and educational support for referrals; and 3) discuss how the implant coordinator is the extension of the office for public relations with the laboratory, specialists and implant companies.


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