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Return to American Academy of Orofacial Pain Events Library Menu

2016
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2015
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2013
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Download all available sessions from the
AAOP 2011 35th Scientific Meeting
Complete Conference Download price $179.00
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Showing sessions 1 - 10 of (23) TOTAL sessions
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Event : AAOP5


Session : AAOP1105
A Coordinated Approach to TMJ Surgery and Post-Op Rehabilitation
Breakfast Session I:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
Speaker(s) :
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  • Paul A. Danielson, DMD Shaun O’Connor, PT, CCTT
  • A portion of facial pain patients require professional assistance from various practitioners. Physical therapy offers various treatment pathways to reduce pain and increase range of motion. Some patients will significantly benefit from various surgical procedures. However surgery alone will not maximize the result for the patient. A coordinated effort between the orofacial pain practitioner, surgeon, physical therapist and when indicated, restorative dentist and orthodontist will greatly improve patient outcome. This presentation will review various surgical options and procedures in detail. Physical therapy is an integral part of the management of facial pain patients, especially the postsurgical cases. Physical therapy approach and treatment modalities will be reviewed.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Indications for surgery of the temporomandibular joint 2. Surgical treatment 3. Physical therapy used to maximize rehabilitation of the postsurgical case


Session : AAOP1106
Portable Monitoring in Sleep Medicine -- What is the Role for the Dentist?
Breakfast Session II:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Dennis R. Bailey, DDS
  • The dentist is increasingly involved in sleep medicine primarily with the use of an oral appliance for the management of sleep apnea. Being exposed to this discipline as they are, the dentist is also exposed to the use of the portable monitor as a means by which they can “screen” patients for sleep apnea. But how does the dentist use the portable monitor properly from both a clinical perspective as well as medical-legal aspect? This course will discuss where we are currently and what to expect in the future, from both the medical and dental perspective. In addition, a variety of devices that are currently available will be discussed as they relate to their usefulness and limitations.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the role of the dentist related to the use of portable monitoring 2. What are the current issues and status of portable monitoring? 3. Understand the devices that are available


Session : AAOP1108
Safe Prescribing of Opioids by Dentists for Chronic Orofacial Pain
Keynote Presentation:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • H. Westley Clark, MD, JD, MPH, CAS, FASAM


Session : AAOP1109
TMD and Gastrointestinal Co-Morbidity
Plenary I:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Emeran Mayer, MD
  • Temporomandibular disorders and functional GI disorders belong to a group of persistent pain disorders which differ in the primary body site where the pain is experienced, but which share many clinical and possibly pathophyisological features. These include persistent pain in the absence of a plausible organ explanation, co-morbidity with other persistent pain disorders (including interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, fibromyalgia and certain forms of low back pain), co-morbidity with disorders of mood and affect, stress sensitivity and response to centrally targeted therapies, including cognitive behavioral therapy and tricyclic antidepressants. Despite intense efforts to unravel the pathophysiology of these symptom-based disorders, our understanding remains limited. Recent efforts have focused on identifying the shared mechanisms which may determine the transition from acute to chronic pain, and the role of the brain in central pain amplification.
  • Learning objectives: 1. To understand differences and similarities in the epidemiology and clinical presentation of various persistent pain disorders 2. To learn about possible biological mechanisms which could underlie the co-morbidity of these syndromes 3. To learn about central mechanisms which have been implicated in central pain amplification


Session : AAOP1111
The Spectrum of Diagnoses in TMD Patients
Plenary III:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • A. Dale Ehrlich, DDS, MS
  • In the process of evaluating and diagnosing TMD patients, there are a variety of conditions and diseases that may be mimicking or masquerading as TMD that must be considered to help make a correct diagnosis. The patients may describe pain and dysfunction that they perceive as arising from jaw tissues that may be referred from another source. It is important that we make a correct diagnosis before starting treatment and there are a variety of conditions that must be kept in mind and considered for the differential diagnosis. During the process of taking a comprehensive history and performing a complete patient evaluation, it is important that we rule out infection, neoplasm, neuropathy, neuralgia and acute tissue trauma. Although a variety of diseases and conditions must be included in the differential diagnosis, the majority of myalgia and arthalgia symptoms driven by the Emotional Motor System in TMD patients arise from persistent stress induced behaviors such as parafunctional or postural habits that have not been addressed. Symptoms may represent a disturbed physiology with dysregulation of the Autonomic Nervous System and HPA axis. Sleep disturbances are very common and must be considered with endocrine, immune, and possible genetic etiology. A comprehensive spectrum of diagnoses must be considered when evaluating TMD patients to ensure a correct diagnosis which will facilitate a successful management plan.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand that TMD pain and dysfunction symptoms perceived as arising from the jaw tissues may represent other conditions mimicking or masquerading as TMD. 2. Identify a spectrum of diseases and conditions that must be included in the differential diagnosis for TMD patients. 3. Understand that a majority of TMD patients have myalgia and arthalgia symptoms which arise from stress induced behaviors driven by the Emotional Motor System.


Session : AAOP1112
Lunch & Learn I: Meet Two Orofacial Pain Patients
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Meet and listen to patients with TMD symptoms and multiple co-morbidities who have been treated at the Navy’s Orofacial Pain Center. With the assistance of Dr. Bertrand, they will detail their histories, describe how biases affected their diagnoses and treatments, and discuss how therapeutic gains were not made until the entire scope of their multiple conditions was addressed.


Session : AAOP1113
Neurochemical Facilitation of Behaviors that May Contribute to Orofacial Pain
Plenary IV:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Barry Jacobs, PhD
  • In human neuro- and psychopathology, three neurochemical/neurotransmitter systems in the brain have garnered a great deal of clinical and preclinical attention. Best known by their non-chemical names, serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, they have been the subject of literally thousands of experimental and clinical studies over the past 40 years. Our research, on laboratory animals, has focused on describing the basic operating characteristics of the groups of neurons that utilize these chemicals for inter-neuronal communication within the brain and spinal cord. As we gained some degree of understanding these features, we began to apply these findings to understanding their role(s) in basic physiological and behavioral processes, many of which have direct clinical implications. A significant portion of our efforts have been devoted to the study of stress, and, deriving from that, their role in adult brain neurogenesis. One conclusion that we and many others have come to is that these systems act primarily as modulators rather than mediators of the varied functions that the central nervous systems carries out.


Session : AAOP1114
Metaboreceptors Use the Same Pathways as Nociceptors
Plenary V:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Alan R. Light, PhD
  • We found that combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate were much more effective than individually applied compounds for activating rapid calcium increases in muscle-innervating dorsal root ganglion neurons. Antagonists for P2X, ASIC, and TRPV1 receptors suggested that these three receptors act together to detect protons, ATP, and lactate when presented together in physiologically relevant concentrations. Two populations of muscle-innervating DRG neurons were found. One responded to low metabolite levels (likely non-noxious); the other responded to high levels of metabolites (likely noxious). We concluded that the adequate stimuli for muscle metaboreceptors and nociceptors are combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate. Experiments infusing combinations of metabolites (protons, ATP, and lactate) into human muscles indicated that fatigue sensations were evoked by low concentrations of metabolites, while ache and hot were evoked by higher amounts. Experiments in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome indicated that gene expression increases in P2X, TRPV1 and adrenergic receptors were strongly correlated with increases in pain and fatigue following moderate exercise in these patients.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Know that muscle sensory neurons detect muscle metabolites and send signals to the brain that are interpreted as fatigue and pain 2. Know that combinations of molecular receptors are necessary to detect muscle metabolites 3. Know that muscle sensory neurons detecting fatigue and pain project to the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. From there, projections ascend to the brain.


Session : AAOP1115
Trigeminal Pathways: Pain and Fatigue in TMD
Plenary VI:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Antoon De Laat, DDS, PhD
  • The kind of the muscle fatigue and pain reported by TMD patients shares characteristics of Chronic Work Related Myalgia (CWRM). Long-lasting contractions primarily recruit the low-threshold motor-units, which then remain active throughout the contraction (Cinderella-hypothesis) and this may lead to “low-frequency fatigue”, which only recovers very slowly. Consequently, intracellular enzymes, peptides and ions are released into the interstitial space, where some of them excite nociceptors or induce inflammation. Spinally ascending nociceptive pathways can activate the HPA-axis and the pathways of the autonomic nervous system. Fatigue has an effect on motor behavior. In addition to the intramuscular attempts to reduce exhaustion, changes occur in the inter-muscular behavior with increased co-activation alterations between muscle groups and changes in global strategy. In contrast to other activities like hammering or sawing, no studies are available for the head-neck system, but postural changes and activation of muscles distant to the actual activity (e.g. tooth clenching) are also possible. Together with aspects of central sensitization, these effects might contribute to the patient’s report of neck pain and stiffness that are observed in the clinic. Also, pain influences motor behavior. During acute experimental pain, decreased activity of the painful muscle, combined with increased involvement of the non-painful muscles, is observed, in line with the pain adaptation model. In chronic muscle pain, the system seems to recruit the muscles differently, so that the painful muscle can reduce its work. Exercise is training of the cardiovascular system and improves quality of life. Exercise can lead to pain and hyperalgesia as in Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, but also has hypoalgesic effects (exercise induced hypoalgesia or EIH). In addition to dynamic exercise, static exercises can also result in EIH. Activation of the opioid system (beta-endorphines) is considered the mechanism underlying EIH but the inconsistencies in the opioid research suggest that also non-opioid mechanisms are involved: exercise can influence all aspects of the biopsychosocial model. Future research on the efficacy of exercise on pain in the masticatory system needs to test specific training programs for specific pain conditions.
  • Learning objectives -- understand: 1. The development and underlying mechanisms of muscle fatigue and its relation to pain 2. The influence of pain and fatigue on motor behavior 3. The potential use of exercise in the therapy of pain and dysfunction in TMD


Session : AAOP1116
Topical Medications for Orofacial Pain Management
Breakfast Session III:
Conference : AAOP 2011 - 35th Annual Scientific Meeting
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  • Gary Heir, DMD Scott Karolchyk, MS, RPh, FIACP, DNM Francisco J. Plaza, DDS
  • The treatment for orofacial pain in most cases is, or includes pharmacological therapy with medications that include antidepressants, analgesics and anti-epileptics. The efficacy of these medications varies from patient to patient depending on a variety of factors such as the pain location, age of the patient and / or any co-morbid systemic diseases. Pharmacologic treatment is often accompanied by unpleasant side effects such as sedation and dizziness. Moreover, interaction with other medications may contraindicate the use of these medications or prevent their use in the medically compromised or elderly patient. An alternate medication delivery method is the use of topical medication. This method is clinically useful for neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain. Topical medications are used to treat only a specific peripheral target with minimal or no systemic effect. This presentation is divided into three sections: An introduction to topical medications, a brief discussions of current research, and new preparations available for use today.
  • Learning objectives: 1. To introduce the topical drug delivery system for treatment of various types of orofacial pain. 2. To identify the indications for the use of topical medications and classes of medications available. 3. To review results of research in the efficacy and side effects of these preparations.



     


Showing sessions 1 - 10 of (23) TOTAL sessions
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